Waste Yearbook 2016

The Afval! Jaarboek 2016 shows the developments in the waste industry and looks ahead to what is to come.

At this sixteenth edition of the Yearbook the content is radically adjusted. The editors have all topics completely re-enumerated, adjusted the structure and content . The result is a more compact Yearbook, in which the information is quickly accessible and clearly presented. In addition, responding to the request of many, the information is also available online. Therefor we have rearranged the information of the Yearbook in two separate product: a print product (the Yearbook) and an online product (the Vademecum).

The Afval! Jaarboek 2016 in its new form gives the current state of the waste policy and the market. The history, developments and detailed information can be found online. The amount and detailedness of the online content differs considerably from the Yearbook. That’s why we have given the site a different name: Vademecum Afval & Recycling.

 

The layout of the Yearbook is similar to previous editions. The book covers the laws and regulations, case law, describes the development of the waste market and presents the most important enterprises. New is that the book aims to give the reader information fast, both in word and image. In addition, the Yearbook gives an overview of Dutch waste and recycling markets, companies, institutions and products, as well as a who-is-who in the waste sector. All developments and data have been updated to early 2016. In the Yearbook is at every paragraph with QR-code to the page on the Vademecum referred, where more detailed information can be found.

Two products

The Waste! Yearbook 2016 and the Vademecum Waste and Recycling do have similarities in structure and content, but are offered as two separate products. This will allow anyone to take the decision himself between print and online.

The language of the Yearbook as well as the Vademecum is dutch.

Below is the content of the yearbook Waste! 2016. If you want an impression of the yearbook, please go to the browsebook. On the abbreviated table of contents on page 4 and 5 you can click on the headings to quickly go through the book.

 


PART I: Policy and market

 

1. EUROPEAN POLICY

 

1.1. INTRODUCTION INTO EUROPEAN WASTE AND RECYCLING POLICY

 

1.2. FRAMEWORKS OF THE WASTE AND RECYCLING POLICY 

1.2.1. Europe 2020 strategy (2010-2020)

1.2.1.1. Flagship initiative resource efficiency ' and ' Route map (2011-2014)

1.2.2. EAPs European environment action programmes:

1.2.3. EU sustainable development policy

1.2.3.1. Action plan on sustainable consumption and production and sustainable industrial policy (2008 – 2010)

1.2.4. EU policies raw materials

1.2.5. EU policy innovation and financing

1.2.5.1. ETAP: environmental technology action plan (2003-2010)

1.2.5.2. EcoAP: action plan for eco-innovation (2011 – 2020)

1.2.5.3. Horizon 2020 (2014-2020)

1.2.6. European waste and recycling policy

1.2.6.1. Waste strategy (2005-2015)

1.2.7. Development circular-economy package (CEP)

1.2.7.1. Circular-economy package (CEP) (2014)

1.2.7.2. Circular-economy package (CEP) (2015) 

 

1.3. EUROPEAN REGULATIONS 

1.3.1. Waste framework directive

1.3.2. Landfill directive

1.3.3. Directive on packaging and packaging waste

1.3.4. Directive on waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE)

1.3.5. Directive on batteries and accumulators

1.3.6. Directive on end-of life vehicles

1.3.7. Directive on n port reception facilities for ship-generated waste and cargo residues

1.3.8. Directive on sewage sludge

1.3.9. Directive on PCB’s and PCT’s

1.3.10. Directive on the management of waste from extractive industries beheer winningsafval

1.3.11. Directive on Industrial emissions

1.3.12. Regulation on shipments of waste

1.3.13. Reach

1.3.14. Regulation on animal by-products and derived products not intended for human consumption

 

 

2. DUTCH POLICY

 

2.1. DUTCH WASTE AND RECYCLING POLICIES.

2.1.1. Development of waste policy in Netherlands

2.1.1.1. Circular economy 

 

2.2. WASTE POLICY FRAMEWORK

2.2.1. National waste management plan (Lap)

2.2.2. "More value from waste letter’

2.2.3. Program: from waste to raw material (Vang)

2.2.4. Waste and recycling objectives overview

2.2.5. Definitions and conceptual demarcation

2.2.5.1. Distinction between waste and non-waste

2.2.5.2. Distinction between disposal and recovery

 

2.3.POLICY INSTRUMENTS FOR WASTE AND RECYCLING 

2.3.1. Laws and regulations

2.3.1.1. Environmental Management Act

2.3.1.2. Law general provisions environmental law (Wabo)

2.3.2. Minimum standards.

2.3.3 Fiscal instruments

2.3.3.1. Packaging tax

2.3.3.2. Waste tax

2.3.4. Subsidies

2.3.5. Understandings and agreements

2.3.5.1. Green Deals

2.3.5.2. Covenants

2.3.5.3. Chain agreements

2.3.6. Waste regulation enforcement 

 

2.4. TOPICS ON WASTE AND RECYCLING

2.4.1. Dossier on waste incineration

2.4.2. Dossier on landfilling

2.4.3. Dossier on vegetable-fruit and garden waste (gft)

2.4.4. Dossier on packaging

2.4.5. Dossier on littering

2.4.6. Dossier on electrical and electronic equipment waste

2.4.7. Dossier on import and export of waste

2.4.8. Dossier energy from waste 

 

 

 

3. WASTE IN FIGURES

 

3.1. OBJECTIVES AND GOALS

3.1.1. Overview of objectives and goals

3.1.2. Objectives and goals for waste, recycling and treatment

3.1.3. Objectives and goals per material

3.1.4. Objectives and goals per product type

 

3.2. STATISTICS ON DUTCH WASTE

 

3.3. STATISTICS ON HOUSEHOLD WASTE COLLECTION

 

3.4. STATISTICS ON PROCESSING OF WASTE AND RESIDUES

 

 

4. DUTCH WASTE MARKET

 

4.1. SALES, PROFITABILITY AND EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR

4.1.1. Market for Waste collection

4.1.2. Market for Waste treatment

4.1.3. Market for recycling

4.1.4. Wholesale trade services of waste and scrap

 

4.2. TOP 40 WASTE AND RECYCLING COMPANIES: TURNOVER AND PROFITABILITY

 

4.3. PROFILES DUTCH WASTE AND RECYCLING  COMPANIES

4.3.1. ACV

4.3.2. AEB

4.3.3. Afvalzorg

4.3.4. Area

4.3.5. ARN

4.3.6. Attero

4.3.7. Avalex

4.3.8. AVR

4.3.9. Avri

4.3.10. Baetsen

4.3.11. Beelen

4.3.12. Circulus-Berkel

4.3.13. Cyclus

4.3.14. Dar

4.3.15. Dusseldorp

4.3.16. EEW

4.3.17. GAD

4.3.18. GMB BioEnergie

4.3.19. GP Groot

4.3.20. HVC

4.3.21. Indaver Nederland

4.3.22. Irado

4.3.23. A. Jansen

4.3.24. Meerlanden

4.3.25. Omrin

4.3.26. Rad Hoeksche Waard

4.3.27. Rd4

4.3.28. Remondis Nederland

4.3.29. Rouwmaat Groep

4.3.30. Rova

4.3.31. RWM

4.3.32. Saver

4.3.33. Shanks Nederland

4.3.34. SNB

4.3.35. Sortiva

4.3.36. Spaarnelanden

4.3.37. Suez Nederland

4.3.38. Theo Pouw Groep

4.3.39. Twence

4.3.40. Twente Milieu

4.3.41. Van Bentum

4.3.42. Van Gansewinkel Groep

4.3.43. Van Kaathoven Groep

4.3.44. Van Werven

4.3.45. Vink

4.3.46. Waardlanden 

 

 

 

PART II: WHO, WHAT, WHERE?

 

1. COMPANIES AND ORGANIZATIONS

Companies and organizations

Companies Registry for products and services

Register of goods and services

Register of trademarks

 

2. PEOPLE IN THE WASTE SECTOR

 

3. INDEX OF COMPANIES, INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANIZATIONS